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Advanced Behaviour Management

Create classroom environments so all students can succeed

Develop a culture of positive behaviour in your classroom.  Learn to manage challenging behaviour effectively, and build self regulation skills in your students as well as yourself.

 

 

Proactively manage behaviour

This Continuous Professional Development course (CPD)  is aimed at teachers with at least two years of experience and who have ideally completed T-Insight, Levels One and Two.

Phase-specific content

Separate modules are available for early years / primary and secondary phases of schooling. The secondary module includes a variety of scenarios across subject areas.

6 immersive scenarios per module

Each module includes six scenarios where teachers view the scenario, then rate the appropriateness of three possible responses and write a brief rationale for each. Next, they find out how expert teachers rated each response and most importantly why.

The feedback report at the end of each module will show teachers their overall alignment with expert teachers and includes resources, articles, readings and ideas for practice. A certificate of completion will be available via ‘My Dashboard’ when teachers finish all three modules.

 

 

 

 

T-Insight

 

Powerful data insights via ‘My Dashboard’

Organisations can evaluate the effectiveness of the course by viewing individual and collective data via the platform.

What modules are included?

Module One: Inclusive and positive interactions with students This module focuses on building positive relationships with students. Expert teachers share how they create a stimulating learning environment where students are motivated, engaged and encouraged to try out new ideas.

 

Module Two: Behaviour for learning This module focuses on how teachers can develop an awareness of their own behaviour in students. Expert teachers share  strategies and approaches for motivating reluctant learners, making learning interesting and managing challenging behaviour.

 

 

 

Module Three: Preventing teacher burnout and handling stress Burnout has always been a risk for teachers but the possibility of this has never been higher. Expert teachers share how they take charge of their own wellbeing, identify stress and how they manage it. The importance of teacher wellbeing is discussed and teachers learn some valuable ways to develop self-regulation skills.

What teaching competencies are developed?

Resilience

Resilience

Emotional Management

Emotion Management

Empathy

Empathy

Communication

Communication

Judgement

Judgement

Adaptability

Adaptability

Mindset

Mindset

Planning

Planning

Organisation

Organisation

Example early years / primary example

All your class are reading ‘Stig of the Dump’ in the same-ability guided-reading groups. The text is on the long-term curriculum plan and fits your topic. Your low-ability reading group has shown no interest in the text and has become unresponsive when discussing the text. They say it is a boring book. This has led to you becoming frustrated and giving them sanctions for not working hard.

Possible response: Keep reading the text as it is on the long-term plan and the rest of the class are enjoying it.

Expert feedback:

“This would be inappropriate as it would not address the group’s lack of motivation and engagement and their learning behaviour. It may lead to the behaviour escalating further. If you have no choice but to continue using the text, then you need to explore ways to support the group to engage with the text, such as:

  • Assess if they fully understand the text. Lack of understanding may be the reason they are not fully engaged or motivated
  • Incorporate drama activities. A practical approach to reading may motivate and engage them”.

Secondary example

A Year 10 student Keeley arrives at your geography lesson after being absent for several weeks. She has missed six lessons and therefore a lot of your subject content which will be important for her GCSE. Although you have been uploading all your lessons with messages for her to the school’s remote learning platform, you have not heard anything from Keeley. You aren’t sure why Keeley was absent but are keen to help her to catch up.

Possible response: >Greet Keeley enthusiastically and provide her with all the handouts she has missed, advising her that you can help her to catch up during lunchtimes or after school

Expert feedback:

“It is important to make Keeley feel welcome. However, bear in mind that she may prefer a low-key return. It is an excellent idea to have hard copies of the work Keeley has missed and it is very supportive to offer your time to help her. Remember that yours is one of many subjects where Keeley will have a significant backlog. It might be wiser to allow her a little time to reacclimatise to school and drip feed her just the most essential sections of the course”.