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Equality, Diversity and Inclusion

Develop highly inclusive classrooms 

Embedding equality, diversity and inclusion principles and practices in the classroom and in the school is vital so all students can thrive, reach their potential and succeed.

Embed Equality, Diversity and Inclusion in your teaching

This Continuous Professional Development course (CPD)  is aimed at teachers with at least two years of experience and who have ideally completed T-Insight, Levels One and Two.

Phase-specific content

Separate modules are available for early years / primary and secondary phases of schooling. The secondary module includes a variety of scenarios across subject areas.

6 immersive scenarios per module

Each module includes six scenarios where teachers view the scenario, then rate the appropriateness of three possible responses and write a brief rationale for each. Next, they find out how expert teachers rated each response and most importantly why.

The feedback report at the end of each module will show teachers their overall alignment with expert teachers and includes resources, articles, readings and ideas for practice. A certificate of completion will be available via ‘My Dashboard’ when teachers finish all three modules.

 

 

 

T-Insight

 

 

Organisations can evaluate the effectiveness of the course by viewing individual and collective data via the platform.

What modules are included?

Module One: Mutual trust and respect

Create an environment of mutual trust and respect where students feel they belong. Teachers are key role models who can influence the values, attitudes and values of their students. Students need to be given opportunities to expand their knowledge and understanding of different cultures and identities in a manner appropriate to the subject being taught.

Module Two: Inclusive practices

This module focuses on ways in which teachers can create classrooms where all students, regardless of their backgrounds and identities are given opportunities to collaborate and interact in a collegial way. Expert teachers discuss the importance of avoiding sexism, racism, and homophobic language and how to handle tensions if they arise.

 

Module Three: Enabling potential and removing disadvantage

This module focuses on creating opportunities so all students can reach their potential, Expert teachers share how they have ensured no student is disadvantaged by teaching practices and curricula.

What teaching competencies are developed?

Resilience

Resilience

Adaptability

Adaptability

Mindset

Mindset

Empathy

Empathy

Emotional Management

Emotion Management

Judgement

Judgment

Communication

Communication

Planning

Planning

Conscientiousness

Conscientiousness

Organisation

Organisation

Example early years / primary scenario

When covering a Year 5 PSHE lesson, where other children are actively sharing their views, Nicole, a child who has recently joined the school, becomes visibly upset. The lesson is about the rights of a child and touches on discussions about refugees, asylum seekers and migrants.

Possible response: Do nothing and continue the lesson, trying to complete it as quickly as possible allowing the others to share their views and thoughts about the subject.

Expert feedback:

As a teacher, it is your duty to provide a safe and comfortable learning environment showing care for all pupils. Although encouraging children to share their views and thoughts could promote positive discussion it would be insensitive to continue this at the expense of upsetting Nicole further. It would be important to discover why Nicole has become upset and support her needs sensitively in future sessions. Discussing the matter with her directly or through an informal session led by the well being support / SENDco could identify aspects to be aware of.

Secondary example

You are introducing a year 7 class to learning German, and as their first homework you ask them to decorate the inside front cover of their book with images they associate with Germany. Tyler covers his with swastikas, and pictures of Hitler and tanks. He has clearly put a lot of effort into it and is very proud of it.

Possible response: Give Tyler a merit/good comment/housepoint (or whatever your school’s system uses), as he has clearly worked hard on it and it is very creative.

Expert feedback

Although Tyler may deserve recognition for the effort he has put in, you cannot ignore the fact that what he has done is inappropriate. He does not understand this, however – he is only 11 or 12. Like many pupils in British schools (and often their parents), his only previous reference point for Germany has been the second world war. He thought he was doing the right thing. If you don’t address the issue, you will encourage lazy stereotypes and  prejudice towards Germany and German people. Allowing it in this context could also potentially give the green light to prejudice in others as well.